Man sitting in a chair using a laptop computer. Text "Webinar Q&A - How to Advocate for Yourself at the Gym" with a lightbulb graphic.

Webinar Q&A – Getting Fit with a Disability: How to Advocate for Yourself at the Gym

Thank you to everyone that joined us on February 28, 2018 for the webinar Getting Fit with a Disability:  How to Advocate for Yourself at the Gym.  In the webinar, participants learned how to create a successful self-advocacy plan, effectively communicate with health and fitness professionals, and develop creative solutions that are a win-win for everyone.

If you weren’t able to join us for the live presentation, you can watch the webinar at any time.  Just click the button below to view a recording of the live webinar.

View Webinar Button - View a recording of the live webinar

Also, I want to share answers to the questions we received during and after the webinar.


Q:  Is the approach I take to self-advocacy going to be different if I am just evaluating a new gym that if I am already a member under contract with a gym?

A:  [Jennifer Hobbs] If you are evaluating a gym, you are in complete control. If you feel that you are not being heard or that the organization is not willing to accommodate you, you can choose not to join and find another facility. If you are interested in learning more about what look for when you are searching for a fitness facility, I encourage you to go to our website and watch our webinar How to Choose Your Gym: 5 Questions You NEED to Ask When You Have a Disability. You will get some great tips on how to plan your gym search as well as identify “red flags” to look for when touring a gym.

If you already belong to a gym, and specifically if you are in a contract, you don’t have the flexibility to just leave. Therefore, self-advocacy becomes more important. Remember, you have the same right to fully participate as any other member of the gym. That is when developing a more formal self-advocacy plan, like the one we discussed today, becomes more important.

Q:  If I don’t get the results that I need from my self-advocacy efforts, what do I do next?

A: [Jennifer Hobbs]  If you do not get the results that you expect, you have several options.

  1. You may want to investigate more official channels.  This may include filing a formal compliant in writing to the organization’s management. You may also want to enlist the support of a disability advocacy organization to pursue a more formal advocacy process.
  2. If you feel that your legal rights are violated, contact an attorney and consider filing a legal action.
  3. Reassess your strategy and goals. Perhaps take another approach or pursue another issue that is easier to resolve.
  4. End your relationship with the facility. If you are under contract, determine the terms of the contract and terminate your membership when the contract expires.
  5. Finally, you may choose to accept the situation, at least for now,  You may decide that continuing to pursue the issue is not worth your time and effort right now.

What are your questions and comments?  Let’s continue the conversation – share your thoughts in the Comments section.

Jennifer's Signature Jennifer Hobbs

Male trainer and mature woman talking at the gym

Free Webinar – Getting Fit with a Disability: How to Advocate for Yourself at the Gym

One of the best ways to get active is by joining a gym or fitness facility. However, navigating the gym can be challenging when you have a disability. Fortunately, you can overcome these barriers and enjoy safe and effective workouts at the gym. The key is successfully advocating for yourself and knowing how to ask for what you need.

What is Self-Advocacy?

Self-advocacy is taking action by speaking up and asking for what you need.  Successful self-advocacy involves knowing your rights, understanding your needs, and effectively communicating those needs to others.

Why is it Important?

If you have a disability, self-advocacy can be a critical skill if you choose to exercise at a gym or fitness facility.  Many facilities are not designed with the needs of individuals with disabilities in mind.  Also, many health and fitness professionals are not aware of the needs of individuals with disabilities in these settings.  Therefore, you need become your own best advocate by taking action to ensure that your needs are met.

Self-advocacy helps you:

  • Get what you need (e.g. information, equipment, resources, instruction) to exercise safely and effectively.
  • Make sure your rights are respected.
  • Develop assertiveness and self-determination.
  • Learn to say no without guilt.
  • Express disagreement while respecting the needs of others.

How Do I Advocate for Myself?

The thought of having to speak up for your own interests can be scary.  Fortunately, self-advocacy doesn’t have to be a daunting task.  It is a learned skill that you can master through proper planning and practice.  The key to success is having a solid strategy that gives you the confidence you need take action.

If you are interested in learning how to become your own best advocate at the gym, I invite you to join me FREE 30-minute webinar.  In this webinar, you will learn:

  • A simple 3-step plan for successful self-advocacy in health and fitness settings.
  • Tips for effectively communicating with health and fitness professionals.
  • Problem-solving strategies for developing creative solutions that are a win-win for everyone!

Here is everything you need to know to join me for this exciting event!

Event Details

Webinar: Getting Fit with a Disability:  How to Advocate for Yourself at the Gym 
Date:  Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Time:  7:00 – 7:30 pm EST
Duration:  30 minutes
Presented By:  Jennifer Hobbs, MS, MBA
President & Founder, IncluFit

To reserve your spot in the webinar (spaces are limited), click on the button below:

Register Now - Click this link to register for the webinar

Or click this link to register:
http://inclufit.clickmeeting.com/399251614/register

Can’t attend the live event? No problem! A recording will be made available to all registered attendees after the live event concludes. We’ll deliver it directly to your inbox for easy access and viewing.

I look forward to seeing you on February 28th!

Jennifer's Signature Jennifer Hobbs

Man sitting in a chair using a laptop computer. Test "Q&A" with a lightbulb graphic.

Webinar Q&A – New Year, New You: Tips for Getting Fit with a Disability

Thank you to everyone that joined us on January 3, 2018 for the webinar New Year, New You:  Tips for Getting Fit with a Disability.  Throughout the month of December 2017, we asked the IncluFit online community to answer the question “What is the #1 barrier individuals with disabilities face in getting fit?”.  We received tons of great responses!  Here is a sample…

  • “Thinking they can’t do it.”
  • “Courage to do it!!”
  • “Motivation.”
  • “No help.”
  • “Lack of accessible places and understanding, inclusive-minded staff.”
  • “Assumption you will hurt yourself.”

…and many, many more!

It was difficult, but we compiled your responses and determined the top 3 barriers faced by individuals with disabilities in getting fit.  In the webinar, we discussed each of these barriers and identified strategies for overcoming those barriers in the new year.

If you weren’t able to join us for the live presentation, you can watch the webinar at any time.  Just click the button below to view a recording of the live webinar.

View Webinar Button - View a recording of the live webinar

Also, we had some great questions during the Q&A that I wanted to share with everyone.  Here is a recap of the Q&A session.


Q:  You talked a lot about advocating for yourself at the gym and asking for what you need, but how do I know if what I’m asking for is reasonable?

A:  [Jennifer Hobbs] That’s a very good question. First, I want to start by saying advocating for yourself can be incredibly challenging especially if you’re someone who doesn’t like to make waves or is afraid of asking for what you need. So, that can be very challenging in and of itself, just to get up the courage to ask for what you need.  Then having the fear of “Is what I’m asking for reasonable or are my expectations skewed? Am I asking for something that’s really not reasonable?” Now, that’s going to depend on what you’re asking for, in what situation you’re in, but I am definitely of the opinion – ask for what you need! However, be willing to have an open conversation with the people. For example, if you’re in the gym and there’s a piece of equipment that would really benefit you that the facility doesn’t have, approach the manager. Have a conversation, but be willing to have a good back and forth. Educate them on why it is beneficial. Help them understand the benefits that it will bring to you and, not just you, but their other clients as well. But, expect that it might not be something that they could do right away. So, always ask. Don’t expect immediate results, but you can, at a minimum, try to work out a plan to see if maybe they could do that in the future. Maybe there’s another option that they could implement right now. So, in my opinion, no request is unreasonable but the important thing is the conversation that you have that you have afterwards.

Q:  How can I tell the difference between pain and just discomfort associated with exercise?

A:  [Jennifer Hobbs]  That’s a tough one. That can be a really challenging one, especially if you live your life with chronic pain. It can be very hard to distinguish what is pain from an injury or condition and what is just general discomfort from using your muscles in a different way or being physically active. In general, anything that causes a sharp, acute, sudden pain that makes you wince or makes you immediately feel like you have to stop, that’s probably an indicator that you should stop. That is, something is exacerbating your injury or condition or potentially causing a new injury. Stop, assess, take a break, come back. The sensations associated with physical activity and exercise feel something like a warmth or a kind of a muscle burn or kind of a gradual buildup of fatigue. That’s indicative of a normal response of your body to exercise, particularly exercise that it may not be used to. So, pain associated with injury is usually more sudden, acute, sharp, extremely painful. Pain associated, pain or discomfort, I don’t want to say pain, but discomfort associated with physical activity is generally a little more gradual, not as sharp, and develops over time. But the best way to really determine that is to set small goals and work up slowly. The more slowly that you work up, adding in exercises to your routine, adding intensity and time you’re going to start to develop the sense of what is pain and what is just regular exercise discomfort.


What are your questions and comments?  Let’s continue the conversation – share your thoughts in the Comments section.

Jennifer's Signature Jennifer Hobbs

Planner with the words "2018 Goals" on the wood floor with dumbbells and an apple.

Free Webinar – New Year, New You: Tips for Getting Fit with a Disability

The new year is quickly approaching which means it’s the perfect time to start thinking about setting your fitness goals for 2018!

Getting more exercise is one of the most common new year’s resolutions, and for good reason! Exercise is one of the best ways to improve both mental and physical health.

Although we all know that exercise is good for us, getting fit and staying active is easier said than done. Maintaining a regular exercise program can be particularly challenging for individuals with disabilities.  Research shows that 47% of adults with a disability get no physical activity.  

Fortunately, you don’t need to let your disability stop you from being active. I invite you to join me for a FREE 30-minute webinar, where I will show you how to overcome the challenges of exercising with a disability and get fit in 2018. 

Here is everything you need to know to join me for this exciting event!

Event Details

Webinar: New Year, New You: Tips for Getting Fit with a Disability
Date:  Wednesday, January 3, 2018
Time:  1:00 – 1:30 pm EST
Duration:  30 minutes
Presented By:  Jennifer Hobbs, MS, MBA
President & Founder, IncluFit

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • The top 3 barriers to getting fit faced by individuals with disabilities.
  • Strategies for identifying and overcoming these barriers.
  • Practical tips to help you stay on track and make 2018 your healthiest year ever!

To reserve your spot in the webinar (spaces are limited), click on the button below:

Register Now! Click Button to Register for Webinar

Or click this link to register:
https://inclufit.clickmeeting.com/224177729/register

Can’t attend the live event? No problem! A recording will be made available to all registered attendees after the live event concludes. We’ll deliver it directly to your inbox for easy access and viewing.

I hope to see you on January 3rd!

Jennifer's Signature Jennifer Hobbs

Young woman sitting on a couch with her knees hugged to her chest looking depressed.

How to Get Motivated to Exercise When You are Depressed

The holiday season is here once again!  For many, the holidays are a wonderful time of year – full of food, family, and happy memories.  However, for individuals suffering from depression and anxiety, the holidays can be a very challenging time.

As holidays approach, most people find their stress rising and their ability to cope fade away.  To add insult to injury, as we move towards winter, we are exposed to less natural light.  This can trigger seasonal affective disorder (SAD), otherwise known as the “winter blues”.  Symptoms of SAD include feelings of hopelessness, low energy, and loss of interest in activities that you typically enjoy.

Fortunately, there are ways to help you manage your depression during the holidays.  One of the best ways to combat depression is with exercise.  Some of the many positive effects of exercise on depression include:

  • Improved mood
  • Increased energy
  • Reduced stress
  • Improved concentration
  • Increased self-esteem
  • Better sleep

The good news is, you don’t need a lot of exercise to feel a difference!  Research shows that as little as one hour of exercise per week can improve mood and ease the symptoms of depression. That is less than 10 minutes of activity per day!

Sounds great, right?  Of course, anyone that has experienced depression knows that this is easier said than done.  Depression saps you of your motivation and energy, and can send you into a seemingly endless loop that sounds something like this…

I know I need to exercise because it will help my depression and make me feel better, but I can’t get moving because I’m depressed! 

These feelings of knowing that exercise can help, but feeling unable to take action can add to anxiety and stress.  Fortunately, there are some simple steps you can take that can help you break the endless loop of self-doubt and begin to add exercise into your life.

Change Your Mindset

The first step in getting moving, is changing the way you think about exercise.  The word “exercise” sounds like work.  It sounds like a task to be accomplished or a chore to be done. In other words, it’s something “extra” you have to fit in to your life.  When you are depressed and have no motivation or energy, the last thing you want to do is add one more thing to your to-do list!

So, start by not thinking about it as exercise at all.  Change your mindset to think of it as simply, movement.  Moving your body is a natural part of life.  By shifting your mental focus from exercise to merely moving your body, you remove the burden of extra work and can begin to appreciate how good it feels to just move.

It is important to find movement that feels good to your body.  Movement should be associated with positive energy and feelings, never discomfort or pain.  If you have physical limitations, find movement that you can do that does not exacerbate existing conditions or injuries.

Everyone’s body is different, so it may take some experimentation to find movement that works for you.  It may be slow and flowing, like yoga, stretching, or tai chi. Or, it may be short and intense, like punching a heavy bag. Or, it may be simple and relaxed like walking.  Remember, any movement that feels good to your body is good for your soul.

Start Where You Are Today

Depression has an ugly way of making you feel like the current version of yourself is not acceptable.  It strips you of your confidence and keeps you from taking that first step forward.  For example, below are some common thoughts you might have when you are depressed.

I would start exercising if only…

…I could get out of bed.

…it wasn’t so cold and miserable outside.

…I wasn’t so anxious around other people.

Don’t let these feelings stop you from taking those first steps to get moving.  Start where you are today and work from there.  Wherever you are today, however you feel, start there and take one step forward.

If you can’t get out of bed, stretch or do some simple yoga poses right in your bed.  If the thought of leaving the house is overwhelming, walk a lap around the house or walk up and down a flight of stairs.  If the thought of having to interact with others makes you anxious, stay home and use an exercise video or online workout that has a movement and instruction style that is a good fit for you.

Create a Safe, Accessible Space to Move

Individuals with depression constantly battle feelings of inadequacy and low self-esteem.  Therefore, it is important that you find a space where you feel comfortable and safe to move without feeling anxious or judged.  This space should be easily accessible to you and provide you with enough room to safely move.  It may be in your own home, at a gym or recreation facility, in your neighborhood, or at a favorite outdoor space like a park or trail.

You should always feel positive and supported in your space.  That means avoiding environments

  • that are highly competitive.
  • provoke an anxiety response.
  • lead to any feelings of inadequacy or self-doubt.
  • where people are critical and unsupportive.

Find Your Support

One of the best things you can do to help yourself find the motivation to move more, is to connect with others for support.  Research shows that positive social support, can decrease stress, increase motivation and improve overall mental health.

There are several ways that you can connect with others and get the support you need.  Pick the option(s) that work best for you based on where you are today.

Meet-Up with a Friend

Schedule a date with someone to meet up and do something active.  This could be a partner, friend, co-worker, or anyone that you enjoy spending time with.   Having a time planned to meet someone can be the motivation you need to get up and get moving.  Just make sure that whomever you choose is supportive, never competitive or critical.

Join an Online Community

If you suffer from social anxiety or do not have anyone in your life right now that can fully support you, consider joining an online community.  Fortunately, there are thousands of options available online.  Just as with your in-person relationships, it is important that you find an online community that fits you.   Take some time to explore different groups to find one that meets your needs.  Your community should be inclusive, supportive, and committed to helping you become healthier.

Team Up with Your Pet

Support doesn’t have to come in human form.  Exercising with your pet is another way to get the support you need to get moving.  Animals are source of unconditional love and support, making them perfect workout partners.  As an added bonus, research has found that interacting with animals has numerous benefits, including:

  • Improving mood by boosting levels of serotonin and dopamine.
  • Reducing levels of anxiety and stress.
  • Increasing motivation.
  • Fostering a sense of purpose and improving self-esteem.

If you don’t have a pet, don’t worry!  Consider volunteering at a local animal shelter as a dog walker or playing with the animals.  There are plenty of homeless animals that would appreciate your time and affection.

Keep it Simple

One of the keys to adding movement into your life when you are depressed is to make it as easy as possible.  Depression can make even the smallest tasks seem overwhelming.  So, take the stress away by keeping it simple and focus on minimizing the effort to move.  Give yourself permission to take the easy road.  If you don’t feel like getting dressed, exercise in your pajamas.  If you normally go to the gym, stay home and do a workout video.

Set Micro-Goals

Another way to simplify is by setting micro-goals, that is breaking up the experience into ridiculously small pieces.  Studies show that breaking down larger tasks into smaller pieces is the best way to accomplish a goal.  This is because every time we accomplish a goal, our brain reacts by releasing dopamine, the “feel-good” chemical.  This good feeling motivates us to continue on, accomplishing more while improving our overall mood.

Here is an example of how you might use micro-goals to encourage yourself to move.

  • I will put on my socks and sneakers.
  • I will go to the kitchen and fill my water bottle and drink.
  • I will walk in a path between the kitchen, the living room, and the hallway for 5 laps.
  • I give myself the permission to stop after 5 laps. If I am feeling good, I will do 5 more laps.
  • When I am done, I will sit in my favorite chair.
  • I will remove my socks and sneakers.
  • I will drink the rest of my water.
  • I will relax for at least 5 minutes.

Use a Timer

Breaking the inertia associated with depression is usually the hardest part.  If we can find a way to just get started and get moving, everything else becomes easier.  One way to help break the inertia is to use a timer to set time-based micro-goals.  Begin by setting small time increments of no more than 5 minutes.  Commit to moving until the timer finishes.

If 5 minutes seems like too much, start with 1 minute.  Also, remind yourself that you are always the one in control.  Before you start, give yourself permission to stop at any time without feeling guilty.  Remember, any movement is better than none at all.

Connect with Something You Love

Movement should always be a pleasant experience.  However, when you are depressed, it can often be hard to connect to the good feelings you get from moving your body.  One tip for helping to create a positive association to physical activity is to connect the activity to something that you enjoy.  For example, if you enjoy music, create a playlist of your favorite songs that you only listen to while you move.  Some other options might include watching favorite TV show or listening to an audiobook during your workout.

You are much more likely to start moving and stay moving when you connect physical activity to something you enjoy.  So, think about what you love and get moving!

Go Outside

Whenever possible, take your activity outside.  Exercising outdoors has additional benefits to indoor exercise.  Compared with exercising indoors, exercising outdoors has been shown to

  • increase feelings of revitalization and positive engagement.
  • decrease tension, confusion, anger, and depression.
  • increase energy.
  • make the activity more satisfying and enjoyable.

So, consider stepping outdoors for your next workout.  As little as 5 minutes of activity outdoors can make a huge difference.

Focus on How You Feel

Take some time both during and after physical activity to focus on how you feel.  Make sure to tune into the sensations in your body before, during, and after.  Take a few minutes after your workout to assess your mood, anxiety levels, and overall mental state. Try to capture the positive feelings resulting from your activity.  The next time you need motivation to move, tap back into those good feelings.

Be Kind and Reward Yourself 

Finally, always take time to reward yourself for every positive step forward.  Every movement should be celebrated!   Speak to yourself in a kind and encouraging way, expressing gratitude for what you and your body have accomplished.

In Conclusion

Take the time to take care of yourself this holiday season.  If you struggle with depression or anxiety, try to add just a few minutes of movement into your life every day.  Even the smallest amount of movement can have a huge impact on your emotional and mental health.

Man sitting in a chair using a laptop computer. Test "Q&A" with a lightbulb graphic.

Webinar Q&A – How to Choose Your Gym: 5 Questions You NEED to Ask When You Have a Disability

Thank you to everyone that joined us on November 15, 2017 for the webinar How to Choose Your Gym: 5 Questions You NEED to Ask When You Have a Disability.  Attendees came away with valuable tips on how to take the stress out of finding the right gym when you have a disability.

If you weren’t able to join us on the 15th – no problem!  You can watch the webinar at any time.  Just click the button below to view a recording of the live webinar.

View Webinar Button - View a recording of the live webinar

Also, we had some great questions during the Q&A that I wanted to share with everyone.  Here is a recap of the Q&A session.


Q:  I have already signed a contract with a gym, and I do like it, but now that I’ve taken this webinar I am realizing that there are some things that should have been red flags. I’ve always just accepted these limitations in the place meeting my needs, but now that I know better what can I do to address the concerns at my current gym?  In other words, how do I advocate for my needs in a gym that I already belong to?

A:  [Jennifer Hobbs]  That’s a great question.  So, I think you’re right, there’s one thing about having the information and knowing the questions to ask and actually being able to advocate for yourself in the gym.  As I had actually just touched on, don’t be afraid to ask questions and if you’re not getting the responses you want one thing I would say first take a look at who are you talking to.  Maybe you’re not talking to the right person.  Maybe you need to talk to a manager.  If you’re still not getting the information or getting the response that you want, I always recommend taking an approach of educating the staff.  Give them your thoughts. Tell them a little bit about inclusive fitness, how they might be able to improve their accessibility and inclusion at their facilities.  If you’d like, volunteer to help them and be your own advocate to help them get that knowledge.

Q:  I can’t seem to find a gym in my area that’s really inclusive. Am I really just looking for a needle in a haystack?

A:  [Jennifer Hobbs]  It can probably feel like that sometimes.  What I have found is a lot of it does depend on where you are. I think here in the United States, what I’d like to term “the inclusion revolution” in the health and fitness industry, is just starting to build momentum.  Inclusion and accessibility is not something that most gyms have high on
their priority list.  I think that certain places, like Great Britain and Australia, have made a lot of progress and are way ahead of the United States in terms of offering things like training to fitness professionals and raising awareness about the importance of inclusive
fitness. So, I can see where you’d think it would kind of be a needle in the haystack and that’s really where the advocacy has to come in.  More than likely, if you are in the United States, if you’re going to a gym, that’s probably not going to be something that is in the forefront of their business model. So, as long as they are willing to work with you, then advocate for yourself and you can probably make a difference. Hopefully, with more training like this and starting to get the word out more about the inclusive fitness movement here in the United States, we are going to start to see a change.  We’re going to see more facilities being more accessible and being more inclusive of individuals with disabilities.


What are your questions and comments?  Let’s continue the conversation – share your thoughts in the Comments section.

Jennifer's Signature Jennifer Hobbs