Man sitting in a chair using a laptop computer. Test "Q&A" with a lightbulb graphic.

Webinar Q&A – How to Choose Your Gym: 5 Questions You NEED to Ask When You Have a Disability

Thank you to everyone that joined us on November 15, 2017 for the webinar How to Choose Your Gym: 5 Questions You NEED to Ask When You Have a Disability.  Attendees came away with valuable tips on how to take the stress out of finding the right gym when you have a disability.

If you weren’t able to join us on the 15th – no problem!  You can watch the webinar at any time.  Just click the button below to view a recording of the live webinar.

View Webinar Button - View a recording of the live webinar

Also, we had some great questions during the Q&A that I wanted to share with everyone.  Here is a recap of the Q&A session.


Q:  I have already signed a contract with a gym, and I do like it, but now that I’ve taken this webinar I am realizing that there are some things that should have been red flags. I’ve always just accepted these limitations in the place meeting my needs, but now that I know better what can I do to address the concerns at my current gym?  In other words, how do I advocate for my needs in a gym that I already belong to?

A:  [Jennifer Hobbs]  That’s a great question.  So, I think you’re right, there’s one thing about having the information and knowing the questions to ask and actually being able to advocate for yourself in the gym.  As I had actually just touched on, don’t be afraid to ask questions and if you’re not getting the responses you want one thing I would say first take a look at who are you talking to.  Maybe you’re not talking to the right person.  Maybe you need to talk to a manager.  If you’re still not getting the information or getting the response that you want, I always recommend taking an approach of educating the staff.  Give them your thoughts. Tell them a little bit about inclusive fitness, how they might be able to improve their accessibility and inclusion at their facilities.  If you’d like, volunteer to help them and be your own advocate to help them get that knowledge.

Q:  I can’t seem to find a gym in my area that’s really inclusive. Am I really just looking for a needle in a haystack?

A:  [Jennifer Hobbs]  It can probably feel like that sometimes.  What I have found is a lot of it does depend on where you are. I think here in the United States, what I’d like to term “the inclusion revolution” in the health and fitness industry, is just starting to build momentum.  Inclusion and accessibility is not something that most gyms have high on
their priority list.  I think that certain places, like Great Britain and Australia, have made a lot of progress and are way ahead of the United States in terms of offering things like training to fitness professionals and raising awareness about the importance of inclusive
fitness. So, I can see where you’d think it would kind of be a needle in the haystack and that’s really where the advocacy has to come in.  More than likely, if you are in the United States, if you’re going to a gym, that’s probably not going to be something that is in the forefront of their business model. So, as long as they are willing to work with you, then advocate for yourself and you can probably make a difference. Hopefully, with more training like this and starting to get the word out more about the inclusive fitness movement here in the United States, we are going to start to see a change.  We’re going to see more facilities being more accessible and being more inclusive of individuals with disabilities.


What are your questions and comments?  Let’s continue the conversation – share your thoughts in the Comments section.

Jennifer's Signature Jennifer Hobbs

Calendar with the text "Join Gym" written in script. A red push pin marks the date of the 20th.

Free Webinar – How to Choose Your Gym: 5 Questions You NEED to Ask When You Have a Disability

It is no secret that most of us struggle to maintain a regular exercise program.  This can be particularly challenging when you have a disability.  Work, school, health issues, and just life in general can make it difficult to carve out even a few hours a week to spend on our own wellbeing.  So how can you get motivated to move more and make exercise a part of your normal routine – join a gym!

A recent study Iowa State University showed that gym members logged a whopping 484 minutes of exercise on average per week compared to only 137 minutes per week for non-members.  Additionally, the odds of meeting weekly physical activity guidelines were 14 times higher for gym members than for non-gym members.  As if that wasn’t enough evidence of the value of a gym membership, researchers also found that gym members were less likely to be obese, had lower blood pressure, higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, and smaller waist circumferences than non-members.

Sounds great!  Sign me up, right?  Unfortunately, the thought of finding the right gym and committing to signing on that dotted line can easily become overwhelming, especially when you have a disability.

Good news!  Choosing a gym doesn’t have to be a stressful experience.  I invite you to join me for a FREE 30-minute webinar, where I will to show you how you can take the anxiety out of choosing a gym when you have a disability.  All it takes is a little planning ahead and asking a few simple questions to help you find your perfect fit.

Here is everything you need to know to join me for this exciting event!

Event Details

Webinar:  How to Choose Your Gym: 5 Questions You NEED to Ask When You Have a Disability
Date:  Wednesday, November 15, 2017
Time:  2:00 – 2:30 pm EST
Duration:  30 minutes
Presented By:  Jennifer Hobbs, MS, MBA,
President & Founder, IncluFit

In this webinar, you will learn:

  • Tips on how to plan ahead to make the most of your gym search.
  • “Red flags” to watch for when touring a gym.
  • The top 5 questions to ask gym staff during the first visit.

I hope to see you on November 15th!

Jennifer's Signature Jennifer Hobbs

Woman flexing biceps in the sun, shown from the back.

SCI Workout Consideration #6 – Muscles & Joints

Of course, all physical activity engages the muscles and joints. Everyone that exercises regularly eventually experiences some muscle soreness or joint pain or stiffness. Usually, these conditions are temporary and are easily treatable with a little rest and proper self-care; however, individuals with SCI need to be particularly aware of several conditions affecting muscles and joints that can be extremely painful and potentially debilitating.

Spasticity 

Spasticity is due to increased tone in a muscle.

What Issues Are Posed With SCI? 

A spinal cord injury disrupts communication between the brain and the part of the nervous system responsible for muscle control below the level of injury. This disconnect can result in a common condition that individuals with SCI need to consider when exercising – spasticity.

Spasticity typically occurs in the muscles below the site of injury and can make it challenging to exercise since it can be very painful. It can lead to abnormal posture, cause deformities in the bones and joints, and can be further exacerbated by exercise.

Symptoms 

Symptoms of spasticity include:

  • High muscle tone
  • Hyperactive stretch reflexes
  • Spasms: Quick and/or sustained involuntary muscle contractions
  • Clonus: A series of fast involuntary contractions
  • Contractures: A permanent contraction of the muscle and tendon due to severe lasting stiffness and spasms

Steps to Reduce Risk When Exercising

There are several steps that you can take to reduce spasticity and make exercise safer and more comfortable.

If you experience spasticity, try:

  • Regular stretching several times per day. This is the best way to reduce spasticity.
  • Aim to hold stretches for 10-30 seconds.
  • Use a partner to assist you in stretching of the non-functioning muscle.
  • If you take medication to control spasticity, try to coordinate the time you take the medication and the time of your exercise session to minimize spasticity during your workout.

To avoid further complications from spasticity:

  • Do not bounce or perform ballistic stretching.
  • Do not exercise when you are experiencing severe spasticity.  Work with your doctor or therapist to reduce spasticity before returning to exercise.
  • Do not exercise when you have an infection. Urinary tract and other infections can increase the risk of spasticity,
  • Do not exercise in cold temperatures, since cold air can increase spasticity.

Overuse Injuries

Individuals with SCI (particularly those that use a manual wheelchair) are susceptible to several overuse injuries. The repetitive motion of pushing a wheelchair puts significant stress on the muscles and joints of the upper body, namely the wrists and shoulders.  

Some of the most common overuse injuries experienced within the SCI community are carpal tunnel syndrome, rotator cuff strain, and shoulder impingement.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome 

Carpal tunnel syndrome results from chronic pressure on the wrist that causes swelling.  The swelling compresses the nerve that runs through the wrist to the hand, the medial nerve, causing pain and weakness.

What Issues Are Posed With SCI? 

Manual wheelchair users are very susceptible to carpal tunnel syndrome because the act of the hand repeatedly gripping and pushing the wheels places a significant amount of force on the hands and wrists.  Studies show that as many as 90% of long-term manual wheelchair users suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome.

Symptoms 

Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome affect the hand and wrist and may include:

  • Pain
  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Weakness

Steps to Reduce Risk When Exercising 

Like most overuse injuries, the best way to keep carpal tunnel syndrome from affecting your ability to exercise is through prevention.

Some steps you can take to reduce your risk include:

  • Wearing padded gloves.
  • Using good body mechanics when pushing your wheelchair.
  • Making sure your wheelchair is fitted properly and equipment is well maintained.
  • Using padding push rims to reduce pressure on the hands
  • Applying ice to the wrists for 20 minutes at the end of each day to reduce any swelling.
  • Incorporating a wrist flexibility and strengthening program into your routine.  

Rotator Cuff Strain & Shoulder Impingement 

The ball-and-socket structure of the shoulder joint makes it extremely mobile but also very vulnerable to possible injuries. For manual wheelchair users, the shoulder joint is the primary joint used during transfers and propulsion. This puts wheelchair users at particularly high risk for developing shoulder injuries.

Rotator cuff strain is most commonly caused by muscle imbalances in the shoulder.

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons around the shoulder joint that are responsible for moving and stabilizing the shoulder joint. The motion of pushing a wheelchair causes certain muscles of the shoulder to be used more than others, leading to muscular imbalances. These imbalances can result in injury to the rotator cuff.

Additionally, individuals with SCI tend to have weak internal and external shoulder rotators.  This weakness can also contribute to rotator cuff strain.

Symptoms of a rotator cuff strain include pain and/or an aching sensation in the shoulder joint.

An image of a man using a wheelchair and holding a dumbbell.

Shoulder impingement is another common injury among wheelchair users because the biomechanics of pushing a wheelchair creates a significant amount of pressure on the shoulder joint. This pressure is 2.5 times higher for wheelchair users than for non-wheelchair users!

Also, long periods spent in a seated position require that wheelchair users frequently reach overhead to grasp objects and perform tasks. Once again, the biomechanics of this movement put considerable stress on the shoulder joint.

Steps to Reduce Risk When Exercising 

You can reduce your risk of developing shoulder injuries by taking the following preventative measures:

  • Always use good body mechanics when pushing your wheelchair.
  • Try to balance out the time pushing in your chair with other types of physical activity that use different movements and muscles.
  • Make sure your exercise routines are well balanced, including stretching, aerobic exercise, and strength training.
  • Incorporate strength training exercises to help reduce muscular imbalances in the shoulder. Be sure to include exercises to strengthen the shoulder’s internal and external rotators!

Conclusion

As you can see, being aware of a few common conditions associated with SCI that can impact exercise will help you take the necessary steps to minimize your risk so that you can exercise safely. Exercising with SCI doesn’t have to be intimidating or scary, and the benefits of exercise are well-worth the investment!

Looking for SCI-friendly exercise guides? Visit our website at inclufit.com to view our exercise videos, equipment, and training tips.

Further Reading 

NCHPAD – Overuse Injuries in Wheelchair Users

NCHPAD – Spinal Cord Injuries

Spasticity

Woman holding an x-ray image of the leg and ankle bones in front of her.

SCI Workout Consideration #5 – Bone Loss

Having weak and brittle bones due to a loss of bone mass can be a significant risk factor for injury during exercise. In general, weak bones are:

  • More susceptible to fractures from forces generated on them during physical activity.  
  • More likely to break as a result of accidents during exercise, such as slipping and falling or injury from a piece of equipment.  Even minor accidents, such as twisting your leg can result in a broken bone.

What Issues Are Posed With SCI? 

Bone loss can impact anyone, however, individuals with SCI are affected at much higher rates than the general population. In fact, it is estimated that 80% of individuals with chronic SCI have bone loss significant enough to be diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis and decreases in bone density of 30% to 40% in the legs is typical after SCI.

Most of the bone loss occurs below the level of injury; therefore, individuals with quadriplegia experience the greatest overall bone loss. Individuals with paraplegia also experience significant bone loss in the lower extremities but maintain bone density in the upper body.

The primary reason for bone loss after SCI is due to the lack of mechanical stress on the bones below the level of injury. This is because every time we move, and even when we are standing still, our muscles are working to support us. When a muscle contracts, it places a mechanical stress on the bone it is attached to and the body responds to the stress by creating more bone. When the muscle can’t contract, the bone-building process ceases and bone mass is gradually decreased over time.

Other factors that contribute to the loss of bone mass in individuals with SCI include:

  • Hormonal changes
  • Changes in metabolism and blood pH
  • Poor blood flow to the limbs
  • Altered gas and nutrient exchange at the bone.

How to Reduce Risk When Exercising

You can significantly reduce your risk of fractures during exercise by always taking the following steps:

  • Exercise in a safe environment. Since accidents are a common cause of fractures, the best way to avoid them is through prevention. This means exercising in a safe environment.  
  • Make sure that your training environment is safe and free from obstacles that may cause a fall.
  • Learn safe transfer techniques to minimize the possibility of injury while transferring from your wheelchair to equipment and back again.
  • Use straps or other adaptive devices to make sure that your trunk is properly supported on equipment and ensure that you can maintain your balance throughout the exercise.
  • Take the time to properly position and secure your wheelchair prior to each exercise.
  • Use appropriate equipment. For example, if you have limited hand function, using cuff weights or weights with straps will allow you to safely perform exercises without the risk of dropping the weight on yourself.  
  • Avoid movements with a high fracture risk. Some movements put excessive stress on the bones, which can lead to fractures.  

To avoid fractures, always:

  • Perform all movements in a slow, controlled manner and always within your range of motion.
  • Avoid movements that put excessive stress on the bones.  Movements to avoid include:
    • Twisting (especially twisting with a weight or other load)
    • Extensive flexion or extension
    • Overstretching can put significant stress on the bones, causing fractures. When performing assisted stretches (i.e. stretches with a partner), make sure your partner avoids extreme tension.

Finally, remember to always check your body after each workout for any signs of fracture, including swelling, redness, and bruising.


Next Up…

#6 Muscle & Joint Issues

Further Reading 

Osteoporosis and Fractures in Persons with SCI:  What, Why, and How to Manage

 

The top of a man's bare feet on a wood plank floor.

SCI Workout Consideration #4 – Skin Breakdown

Anyone participating in physical activity can expect to experience skin irritations and injuries, such as cuts, scrapes, and bruises, at one time or another.  For most people, these issues are unpleasant and annoying; however, skin breakdown and irritation can be a potentially serious condition for exercisers with SCI.

What Issues Are Posed With SCI? 

In general, the loss of sensation below the level of SCI can make it difficult to realize when skin breakdown occurs. You may not be able to feel when you have a new cut or sore.

Increased friction on the skin from physical activity can lead to skin breakdown. When moving, friction occurs during skin on skin contact and from contact with clothing and equipment. Friction can also occur on areas of the body in contact with prosthetics, assistive devices, and adaptive equipment.

It’s important to note that skin breakdown experienced below the level of SCI injury can put you at serious risk for developing Autonomic Dysreflexia (AD).

There are a number of types of skin breakdown that individuals with SCI need to be aware of when exercising:

Pressure sores, or pressure ulcers, are areas of skin that are damaged due to a lack of blood flow to the area. These lesions are caused when pressure is applied to the skin and not relieved on a regular basis. They can occur from:

  • Sitting or lying in one position for too long
  • Sitting or lying on hard surfaces
  • Improperly fitting prosthetics and adaptive equipment
  • A buildup of moisture on the skin

Untreated pressure sores will gradually worsen and can cause serious complications.

Blisters are raised areas of skin filled with fluid or blood.  Blisters result from friction on the skin when it repeatedly rubs against the body, clothing, or equipment.

Abrasions, or scrapes, are caused when the skin is scraped away when rubbed up against a rough surface.

Lacerations, or cuts, are the result of the skin being cut or torn open.

How to Reduce Risk When Exercising 

To prevent pressure sores:

  • Stay well hydrated. Make sure to drink water before, during, and after exercise.
  • Avoid sitting on hard surfaces and use a well-padded wheelchair cushion whenever possible.
  • Wear clothing that is well-fitting, moisture-wicking, and appropriate for the activity/exercise.
  • Consider taping or padding areas that are prone to skin breakdowns, such as feet and heels.
  • Make sure all prosthetics and adaptive equipment are properly fitted.
  • Perform pressure reliefs, such as wheelchair push-ups, every 20 minutes.
  • Change position on a regular basis.
  • Secure yourself to equipment to reduce friction.

To prevent blisters, abrasions, and lacerations:

  • Use talcum powder, petroleum jelly, or another type of skin lubricant to reduce friction.
  • Make sure all prosthetics and adaptive equipment are properly fitted.
  • Wear gloves to protect the hands.  
  • Use plastic wheel-guard covers on wheelchairs.
  • Use caution when transferring on and off equipment.

Remember: always check your body during and after your workout for new sites of skin breakdown and pay close attention to areas that are more prone to skin breakdown, such as the hips, sacrum, feet, and heels.


Next Up…

#5 Bone Loss

Further Reading 

NCHPAD – Overuse Injuries in Wheelchair Users

Human Kinetics – Medical Conditions in Athletes With Spinal-Cord Injuries

Exercise After Spinal Cord Injury

Close up of a smartwatch displaying the heart rate monitoring function.

SCI Workout Consideration #3 – Heart Rate

An increase in heart rate is a normal and typical response to exercise. Your heart rate will increase with exercise intensity until it reaches a maximum heart rate based on a number of factors (including age and gender); however, the magnitude of the heart rate response during exercise can vary significantly among individuals with and without SCI.

What Issues Are Posed With SCI? 

Your heart rate response to exercise is directly related to the level of the spinal cord injury.

T7 Injury or Below: Individuals with SCI at T7 or below, typically display heart rate responses similar to individuals without SCI.

Paraplegia: The maximum predicted heart rate for individuals with paraplegia is suppressed. Current guidelines from NCHPAD recommend keeping exercise intensity at or below 70% of your maximum heart rate.

Quadriplegia: The maximum predicted heart rate for individuals with quadriplegia is 100 to 125 bpm. Current guidelines from NCHPAD recommend keeping exercise intensity between 50-70% of your maximum heart rate.

How to Reduce Risk When Exercising 

The most effective way to make sure that you are training in a safe range based upon your injury is by monitoring your heart rate during exercise using an electronic heart rate monitor or by taking your pulse.

The rate of perceived exertion (RPE) scale is another way to gauge if you are working at an appropriate level of intensity. The RPE scale can be used alone or in conjunction with heart rate monitoring and is based upon how hard you feel you are working, on a scale from 7 (Easy) to 20 (Very, Very Hard).  The goal is to exercise at an intensity of about a 10-14, depending on your level of SCI.


Next Up…

#4 Skin Breakdown

Further Reading 

Get Moving: Exercise and SCI

NCHPAD – Spinal Cord Injuries